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Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objects (Read 1809 times)
Tony
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Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objects
06/06/10 at 13:05:48
 
Jupiter has been struck twice in the last year.  I created a simulation to explore the orbits of objects that strike Jupiter.  I created 20 objects orbiting Jupiter in unstable orbits.  They were given initial conditions of sma=22 to 24 million km, inclination = 180 +- 100%.  The simulation shows the objects escaping Jupiter orbit through the L1 and L2 points.  Objects escaping through L2 enter solar orbits with aphelions near the orbit of Saturn.  Those escaping through L1 enter Hilda-like orbits in the main asteroid belt.  The difference between them and true Hildas are that Hildas are in a 3:2 resonance with Jupiter.  After escaping, each asteroid remains in an orbit that permits future capture through L1 and L2.  Some asteroids enter through L1 and escape through L2, and vice-versa.  Sometimes a captured asteroid strikes Jupiter before it has a chance to re-escape.
 
http://orbitsimulator.com/gravity/simulations/JupiterEscapees.gsim
 
This simulation is set in a rotating frame with a period of Jupiter's orbital period.  This highlights the L1 and L2 points of the Jupiter-Sun system.    Some things I'd like to investigate is what is the ratio between time spent in solar orbit vs. time spent in Jupiter orbit, and what it the probability that a captured object will strike Jupiter rather than re-escape.  It seems that given enough time, every asteriod in the simulation should ultimately collide with Jupiter.  But the real-life population is not depleted, so what is refreshing it?  Do escaped objects ever have their orbits evolve in such a way to prohibit future captures?  If so, do they ever evolve back into capturable objects?  If so, this might reveal the source of asteroids refreshing this population.
 
Feel free to play with the simulation to try to answer some of these questions.
 

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frankuitaalst
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Re: Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objec
Reply #1 - 06/07/10 at 12:45:20
 
Nice simulation Tony . I sure want to participate in your research . Can you define some initial conditions , so that I can run a simulation too ?  
Maybe the inclination is somewhat large . Maybe also the timestep of 1024 is large in order to get a distinction between capture and collision ?
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Tony
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Re: Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objec
Reply #2 - 06/10/10 at 13:53:28
 
Thanks, Frank.  The initial inclinations are with respect to Jupiter.  After they leave Jupiter, they have solar inclinations similar to Jupiter's solar inclination.  The other starting conditions are listed in my OP.  SMA of 22 to 24 million km around Jupiter puts them in unstable orbits.  Time step of 1024 probably is too fast for most collisions.  Just look at this as a starting guideline for investigating these types of objects.
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objec
Reply #3 - 06/10/10 at 22:55:52
 
ok , understood , I did not understand the initial orbital setup were relative to Jupiter , now it's clear .  
I have one sim running , amazing how the bodies escape . I have one question : I'm willing to use my viewer in order to analyse the escape and eventual capture again.  
However if I output the Sma....and other params the values are relative to Jupiter .  
Is there some way to have the parameters relative to the sun ?
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Re: Exploring the orbits of Jupiter-striking objec
Reply #4 - 08/23/10 at 07:15:44
 
Another new collision on Jupiter !!
 

 
"Amateur astronomer Masayuki Tachikawa of Kumamoto city, Japan, video-recorded an apparent impact on Jupiter. The movie of the fireball:
 
http://libra-co.com/Jupiter2010Aug20182212UT.wmv
 
This is the third time in only 13 months that amateur astronomers have detected signs of impact on Jupiter. The earlier events occured on July 19, 2009, and June 3, 2010. Jupiter is getting hit more often than conventional wisdom would suggest, leading many researchers to call for a global network of telescopes to monitor Jupiter 24/7 and measure the impact rate.
 
"Like the event of June 3rd, this fireball did not produce any visible debris," notes John Rogers, director of the British Astronomical Association's Jupiter section. "Here are some hi-resolution images taken 1-2 rotations before and 1-2 rotations after the event. As the observers commented, there was no visible mark (not in RGB, nor UV, nor methane), post-impact. Dark brown spots on the North Equatorial Belt were already there before the fireball."

 
source: http://spaceweather.com/
 
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The diversity of the phenomena of nature is so great,and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich,precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment.
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