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ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assist (Read 3396 times)
Tony
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ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assist
11/10/07 at 21:52:28
 
On November 13, 2007, the spacecraft Rosetta will make its 2nd of 3 flybys past Earth for a gravity assist.  Here's the simulation:
http://orbitsimulator.com/gravity/simulations/EarthFlybyNov2007.gsim



 
Following the assist, Rosetta will be on target for an encounter with an asteroid called Steins on September 5, 2008.



 
After encountering Steins, Rosetta returns to Earth for a 3rd flyby in November 2009.



 
After receiving a gravity assist from the November 2009 flyby of Earth, Rosetta will be on target for a flyby of the asteroid Lutetia, one of the solar system's largest asteroids.  After passing the asteroid, Rosetta will hibernate for several years before encountering its primary target: Comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
 
The simulation in this post will take you from the 2nd Earth flyby to the 3rd Earth flyby, and the Steins encounter inbetween.  But because mid-course correction burns are not included in the simulation, the 3rd Earth flyby is not at the correct distance, hence the rest of the mission is not accurately simulated.
 
Prior to the November 2007 Earth flyby, Rosetta received a gravity assist from Mars on February 25, 2007.  If you run the simulation backwards (menu Time > Time Backwards), focus on the Sun, and zoom out so Mars' orbit is visible, you can watch this flyby too.  Again, without simulating the mid-course corrections this flyby will not be perfect, but it is close.
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EDG
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Re: ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assi
Reply #1 - 11/14/07 at 18:00:45
 
There are some pretty awesoms shots of Earth from the flyby here:
http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001232/
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shellandtube
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Re: ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assi
Reply #2 - 11/15/07 at 11:15:24
 
Really nice pictures cheers for the link mal!
 
Theres a nice video in HD of Earth setting from the south pole of the Moon. Its on MSN Video and probably a few other places but have no link for it yet.
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EDG
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Re: ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assi
Reply #3 - 11/15/07 at 20:12:10
 
Quote from shellandtube on 11/15/07 at 11:15:24:
Theres a nice video in HD of Earth setting from the south pole of the Moon. Its on MSN Video and probably a few other places but have no link for it yet.

 
This one?
http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001230/
 
It's from the Japanese Kaguya lunar orbiter, not Rosetta Smiley. Still very pretty though!
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shellandtube
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Re: ESA's Rosetta flys by Earth for a gravity assi
Reply #4 - 11/15/07 at 22:47:16
 
Yeah thats the one, i knew it wasnt rosetta but couldn't remember the name of the Japanese probe. Its  named after a moon godess or similar from ancient japan.
 
Just imagine how beautiful that shot would be if it was Saturn rising/setting from Titan!
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