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Collisions of Solar Systems (Read 3581 times)
frankuitaalst
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Collisions of Solar Systems
09/03/07 at 12:01:52
 
Here is a sim that simulates the collision of two solar systems.  
In particular the collision of our solar system with its hypothetical twin solar system. Huh
The twin solar system is an exact copy of our solar system consisting of Sun , the Planets and our moon .  
The twin was located at 1*10+13meters from our sun , also at 100 AU from our sun .  
In order not to get a front front collision a vertical speed of 500m/s was added to the twin system , hoping the twin system would nearly miss our sun at closest approach.  
 
The sim was created taking the sim of our solar system , available under "download" in this site and copying all the bodies , renaming them with index 2 , then adding a 10+13m to the horizontal position and adding 500m/s to the vertikal velocity .  
What happens ?  
Running the sim you'll see the two systems approach each other .
(Our sun is centered - so she will not move ) .  
As time goes you'll see the orbit of the outer planets change as they are attracted by another sun .  
What happens further ?  
You'll see this in the next post ...
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #1 - 09/03/07 at 12:11:37
 
....
Running this sim screenshots were made at several moments .  
As time goes the systems get nearer and nearer , so the picture zooms in at several times in order to get the details .  
In order to identify the planets the sim pauses sometimes to display the planets by name.  
Getting nearer to each other time step is decreased to gain accurancy ...
Watch how the planets interact and mix up with each other.  
The approaching sun ( in yellow ) seems to head for our sun , although she has a tangential velocity .
At the end of this sim you'll see both moons leaving their Earth ( blue and grey orbits) , gaining some independancy .
What happens ? Will planets collide ? Will Earth survive ?  
(  Smiley you can see it i the next episode )
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #2 - 09/03/07 at 12:30:29
 
...... (  Winkin the continuing story of ...) you see today the collision of our sun with her twin sister.  
Before merging the sister appraoches with a speed of more than 500 km/sec !!
Prior to the collision our Earth ( blue orbit )  has a rather close pass with the sister sun and is directed downwards.  
Will she survive ?  
( you'll see it in ....)
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #3 - 09/03/07 at 12:51:24
 
....( Epilog ) ...
In the last frames which cover about 9 AU the inner solar system ends up with  
two moons , two Mercurys and one Earth .  
Unfortunately it's Earth2 which orbits our sun  Sad.  
On a larger scale the system has two Jupiters , two Saturns ...
No planets were lost till now in collisions.  
And our Earth ?  
She is on her way with Venus ( at 4 'o clock , near the right ) heading for another star ....
 
There are of course many scenarios possible in such collisions , but it makes really fun to see how the planets interact ...
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #4 - 10/27/07 at 07:54:23
 
Another type of collision of our solar system is shown herunder.  
The innerplanets including Mars and Jupiter are shown here edge on just before and after an impact of a solar mass into our sun .  
Starting conditions were a solar mass at 133 AU above the ecliptic with a small offset of 1.33AU .  
So the added solar mass approaches from above  .  
The offset was not big enough to avoid our sun .  
The biggest influence of the approach is that all the planets become highly inclinated .  
As a second result all the orbits become elliptical as after the impact the suns mass is increased with a factor 2.  
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« Last Edit: 10/28/07 at 10:44:38 by frankuitaalst »  

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shellandtube
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #5 - 10/28/07 at 10:48:18
 
Interesting sim frank. Assuming the second solar mass was initially at rest then the 2 suns would accelerate towards each other essentially at the same rate. (neglecting the mass of the planets) Our sun would drag the planets with it as it approached the other sun and at the point of collision the twin sun would almost come to rest (the planets would mean the velocities were close but not equal) whilst the planets would still have a velocity in the z plane. Explaining the inclination of the orbits. You can see this must be true as the outer planets which are not as strongly bound to the sun are lagging below the ecliptic untill the collision occurs then they "appear" to change direction. They dont really its just the "point of view" coming to rest at the new sun.
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The shortest distance between two points is a straight line, or is it?
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frankuitaalst
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Re: Collisions of Solar Systems
Reply #6 - 10/29/07 at 05:38:37
 
Quote from shellandtube on 10/28/07 at 10:48:18:
Interesting sim frank. Assuming the second solar mass was initially at rest then the 2 suns would accelerate towards each other essentially at the same rate. (neglecting the mass of the planets) Our sun would drag the planets with it as it approached the other sun and at the point of collision the twin sun would almost come to rest (the planets would mean the velocities were close but not equal) whilst the planets would still have a velocity in the z plane. Explaining the inclination of the orbits. You can see this must be true as the outer planets which are not as strongly bound to the sun are lagging below the ecliptic untill the collision occurs then they "appear" to change direction. They dont really its just the "point of view" coming to rest at the new sun.

Your analysis is totally correct ! . The second sun was at rest in the beginning . It took her more than 100 years to collide .
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